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obsessions

Obsessions

My mentor, Todd, insisted that I write daily to improve my writing skills since I wrote in the blog.  I write once or twice in a week but not daily.  I write few paragraphs from the book Writing down the Bones.  I choose this book, for I find the meditative approach of Natalie to be very simple yet effective.  I am not suggesting that the other books, which I have read are not worthy and entertaining.  Indeed, most of them are funny for example, On Writing Well by William Zinsser, Bird by Bird by Anne Lammot, etc.  However, Goldberg, I believe, hits the nail on the head.

Yesterday I wrote a few paragraphs from the topic titled Obsessions from the book Writing Down the bones.   Natalie states that obsessions can provide a writer a list of things to write about, but, on the flipside, an obsessions may shows its ugly face.  She suggests that obsessions might, negatively, take over your life, however, you ought to get them work for you.  She states about dieting—eating less and how dieting turns out to be an obsession right after you start willfully eating less. She wittily says, “It’s like when I decide to go on a diet.  Right after I make the decision, food seems to be the only real thing on earth, and as I drive the car, run down the block, write in my journal—all these actions become ways of avoiding the one thing I suddenly really want.  For me, it works better to give food and hunger a space in my life, but in a friendly way so that I don’t destructively devour twelve cookies at a time.”

Don’t you feel Natalie speaks your mind?  When I competed in bodybuilding my diet regimen was immensely strict.  However, right after the competition I would go all out and eat a heavy meal.  Moreover, that would continue for many days, for I would be obsessed to eat more food.  The tedious dieting would takes its toll on the mind, and it led to my voracious eating for several days. It would take a few months’ time to satiate the craving and come back to normalcy.   For example, biscuits are a big no while you want to get shredded.  However, I would go crazy and eat a pack full of Jim Jam cream biscuits when I couldn’t control the craving.

However, as Goldberg speaks we ought to deal with obsessions cleverly.  We need to cajole and tame the mind and say that binging is not the way.  I believe positive reinforcement and self-talk helps tremendously–prior preparation and being aware in advance to encounter the nasty situation. Your response to the trouble ahead is taken care judiciously than haphazardly.   And, importantly, not eating a pack of Jim Jam.  Ha!

 

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